Modern Optics, Short Courses

OPTICAL IMAGING SYSTEMS TO GUIDE SURGERY AND RADIATION THERAPY

Brian Pogue, Dartmouth College, United States

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ABSTRACT

Optical and x-ray radiation source technologies are the two central pillars for human medical imaging and therapy, and interventional guidance in treatment is guided by both of them. The strengths of x-rays are deep tissue penetration, effective cytotoxicity, and the ability to image with robust projection and computed-tomography methods. The major limitations of x-ray use are the lack of molecular specificity and the carcinogenic risk. In comparison, optical interactions with tissue are strongly scatter dominated, leading to limited tissue penetration, making imaging and therapy largely restricted to superficial or endoscopically directed tissues. In comparison, optical photon energies are comparable with molecular energy levels, thereby providing the strength of intrinsic molecular specificity. Additionally, optical technologies are highly advanced and diversified, being ubiquitously used throughout medicine as the single largest technology sector.
This short course will review the roles of guidance and the technologies used to ensure that therapy is delivered accurately. The parts of course are:
• 1. Optics & X-rays in medicine – review of strengths, limitations and synergies
• 2. Optical surgical guidance in medicine – visualization, structures, perfusion, metabolism & immunology
• 3. Optical guidance in radiation therapy – positioning, surface maps, dosimetry, verification & quality audit

Learning objectives
This course will provide the technical participants with a basic understanding of the uses of x-rays and optical systems in medicine.
The course will provide expert research guidance on:
surgical guidance systems and what is possible;
molecular imaging capabilities and emerging molecular tracers for human use;
radiotherapy techniques and technologies used;
camera systems and spectroscopic techniques for sampling these signals;
measurement tools for dose and molecular sensing.

Representing author

photo

Prof. Brian Pogue

Dartmouth College, Professor
United States

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