Nanobiophotonics, Plenary Lecture

APPLICATION DRIVEN POLYMERIC MULTILAYER ENCAPSULATING ENVELOPES: TUNING THE SIZE AND COMPOSITION

Maria Antipina, Institute of Materials Research & Engineering, A*STAR, Singapore

ABSTRACT

Polymeric multilayer microcapsules assembled on sacrificial templates are well known for a number or remote release options including the controlled optical addressing of a single entity. However, before being opened in a controlled manner, the capsules must be delivered to their in vivo site of action. Intravenous drug administration implies the capsules extravasate into damaged tissues from the bloodstream. The efficacy of drug delivery in such a case depends strongly on the capsule size. Recent advances in nanomedicine1 revealed that the size of drug carriers must not exceed 200 nm which is significantly smaller than the common size of biodegradable polymeric multilayer microcapsules (2 µm). A strategy to design submitcrometer sized capsules appears to be quite complex and multidisciplinary task involving manipulations with both sacrificial template and polymeric multilayer. Beyond the size issues, non-homogenous enzymatic composition of human gastroenteric system and a difference in enzymes acting in normal and diseased cells open up an avenue to design an enzyme-specific responsive drug carrier system for better delivery outcome.

References:
(1) Danhier, F.; Feron, O.; Préat, V. To Exploit the Tumor Microenvironment: Passive and Active Tumor Targeting of Nanocarriers for Anti-Cancer Drug Delivery. J. Control. Release 2010, 148 (2), 135–146.

Representing author

photo

Dr. Maria Antipina

Institute of Materials Research & Engineering, A*STAR
Singapore

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